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A word class round up

That time has now come to do a round up of all the word class blog posts I have been writing for the past year. But first:

What is a word class? Every single word belongs to a word class. A word class will summarise the ways in which this word can be used in grammar. However, it's important to remember in some cases a word could belong in maybe two or three word classes. This would depend on what role this word plays in it's sentence, therefore some words can belong to multiple word classes at different times (this makes it sound very confusing, but don't worry it's not something to worry about, it's more like something you should be aware of). Let's begin with a nice one... Nouns A thing; a place, object or person and is usually subject of your sentence (the thing the rest of your words revolve around). There are also four types of nouns: concrete, abstract, collective, proper. For a more detailed explanation, check this out: What is a Noun? (sophiesproof.com) Adjectives A word that is being used to describe or add meaning to another word. And more complicatedly there are nine types of adjectives: descriptive, quantitative, proper, demonstrative, possessive, interrogative, indefinite, articles and compound. For a more detailed explanation, check this out: What is an Adjective? (sophiesproof.com) Verbs A word that describes an action, state or occurrence. And just like all our previous word classes, there's more than one type: dynamic, stative, modal. For a more detailed explanation, check this out: What is a Verb? (sophiesproof.com) Adverbs A word that describes a verb. In my opinion, I think this is where things get a little complicated. Adverbs do end in 'ly' but that is just the tip of the iceberg. There is way more to adverbs than just that, in fact there are adverbs of: time, place, manner, frequency, degree and also adverbial phrases. These are the most common types of adverbs. For a more detailed explanation (and to get further into the rabbit hole of adverbs), check this out: What is an Adverb? (sophiesproof.com) Determiners They come before a noun and identifies (or you could say determines) whether the noun or phrase is general or specific. And of course, there are four types: articles, demonstrative, possessive, indefinite. For a more detailed explanation, check this out: What is a Determiner? (sophiesproof.com) Conjunctions To put it simply, these are words that join sentences/ clauses together or coordinate words in the same sentence. There are coordinating, subordinating and correlative conjunctions. For a more detailed explanation, check this out: What are Conjunctions? (sophiesproof.com) Prepositions Provide vital information to a sentence, either telling you where or when something is in relation to something else (vague, I know). There are prepositions of movement, place and time and can also be categorised between simple and compound. For a more detailed explanation, check this out: What are Prepositions? (sophiesproof.com) And last but not least... Pronouns They take the place of a noun in a sentence to keep writing more concise and to prevent a lot of repetition in writing. And there are: indefinite, personal, demonstrate, possessive, relative, interrogative pronouns. For a more detailed explanation, check this out: What are pronouns? (sophiesproof.com) Each word plays an essential part in language, however it's not essential for you to know the ins and outs of each one. What is important is being aware of them and using your knowledge to help to improve your writing and ensuring your grammar is correct. So this post isn't about making sure you all know about word classes because it's essential, it's just if you're interested in learning more about the dynamics of grammar.

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